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  • Arkansas Treatment Facility Breakdown by Type:
  • (28) Alcohol Addiction Treatment
  • (14) Transitional Living Services
  • (34) Outpatient Alcohol Treatment
  • (18) Alcohol Day Treatment Services
  • (17) Residential Short-Term Treatment for Alcoholism
  • (16) Residential Long-Term Treatment for Alcohol Abuse
  • (12) Dual Diagnosis
  • (5) AIDS/HIV Clients
  • (13) Women
  • (14) Men
  • (6) Mental Stability and Alcohol Abuse Treatment
  • (16) Alcohol Detox
  • (7) Inpatient Hospital Treatment
  • (8) Services for Young Adults
  • (4) Lesbian and Gay
  • (6) Over 50
  • (7) Expectant Mothers
  • (17) DUI - DWI Offenders
  • (19) Hearing Impaired Clients
  • (4) Spanish Speaking
  • (5) Mental Balance Treatment Services
  • (9) Court Appointed Client Services
  • (3) Residential Beds for Adolescents
  • (1) American Indian and Alaska Native Languages
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Alcoholism in Arkansas has become a major problem; thus creating the need for more quality alcohol rehabs to be located in and around the state. Seeking an alcohol rehabilitation program in Arkansas can appear to be a daunting task, as there are many types of alcohol rehab, including long term, short term, inpatient or outpatient, just to name a few.

When an individual from Arkansas makes the choice to seek alcohol rehabilitation, they will have a choice of which type of alcohol treatment program will benefit them the most. One alcohol rehabilitation option is outpatient alcohol rehab; this type of alcohol rehabilitation program will allow the individual from Arkansas to be able to attend alcohol treatment classes and to still be able to meet their obligations at home. Another treatment option is a residential inpatient alcohol rehab, which will allow the individual from Arkansas to reside at the alcohol rehabilitation facility where they will be able to focus solely on their alcohol treatment program. The type of alcohol treatment that an individual receives depends on the severity of their alcohol addiction as well as the resources that are available in and around Arkansas.

Alcohol rehabilitation programs generally begin with detoxification (the process of safely getting alcohol out of your system), individual or group counseling, as well as skills and training courses to help prepare for returning to Arkansas to live an alcohol-free lifestyle. There are many quality alcohol rehab facilities that can offer an individual from Arkansas promising types of counseling that can teach them to identify situations and feelings that trigger the urge to drink and can help them to find new ways to cope that do not include alcohol use. The primary goal of any quality alcohol rehab program should be to enable the individual from Arkansas to successfully achieve a state of lasting sobriety.


Arkansas alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004.The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for Arkansas, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+).

All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon an Arkansas police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

It is important to note that the Arkansas drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

550

334

61

304

55

1983

557

315

57

288

52

1984

525

311

59

267

51

1985

534

299

56

268

50

1986

603

361

60

318

53

1987

639

366

57

308

48

1988

610

361

59

317

52

1989

647

380

59

339

52

1990

604

344

57

300

50

1991

608

362

60

305

50

1992

588

286

49

242

41

1993

583

241

41

200

34

1994

609

226

37

183

30

1995

631

243

39

182

29

1996

615

237

39

194

32

1997

660

216

33

178

27

1998

625

216

35

179

29

1999

604

212

35

170

28

2000

652

223

34

175

27

2001

611

195

32

151

25

2002

640

241

38

206

32

2003

627

254

41

203

32

2004

704

276

39

236

33

2005

648

233

36

208

32

2006

665

245

37

197

30

2007

650

226

35

182

28

2008

600

205

34

171

28

2009

585

211

36

168

29



2003-2004 Arkansas Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

6.61%

[43rd of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

11.2%

[46th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

41.5%

[45th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

4.2%

[40th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

276

[24th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.993 per 10,000 people

[7th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

39%

[23rd of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

40.66%

[45th of 51]

'Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

''When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Arkansas?

  • Non-commercial drivers in Arkansas age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles in Arkansas are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. Under Arkansas law, a school bus driver is a commercial driver.
  • Drivers under 21 in Arkansas are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Arkansas

  • First-time offenders in Arkansas face a term of imprisonment of up to one year. If, however, a passenger under 16 was in the vehicle at the time of the offense, the offender must serve at least 7 days. First-time offenders in Arkansas are also subject to a fine ranging from $150 to $1,000. A first-time offender whose BAC was at least .08 but less than .15 will have his or her Arkansas driver's license suspended for 120 days, unless the offender is permitted to drive on an ignition interlock restricted license. A first-time offender in Arkansas whose BAC was .15 or greater faces a license suspension of 180 days, unless the offender is permitted to drive on an ignition interlock restricted license.
  • A person in Arkansas who commits a second DWI within five years of the first conviction faces a term of imprisonment of 30 days to one year or no less than 30 days of community service. If, however, a passenger under 16 was in the vehicle at the time of the offense, the prison term ranges from 30 days to one year or at least 60 days of community service. These Arkansas offenders are also subject to a fine ranging from $400 to $3,000. A second-time offender whose BAC was .08 or more faces a two-year license suspension. If the offender is permitted to drive on an ignition interlock restricted license, the suspension period is a minimum of one year.
  • A person in Arkansas who commits a third DWI within five years of the previous convictions faces a prison term of 90 days to one year or no less than 90 days of community service. If, however, a passenger under 16 was in the vehicle at the time of the offense, the prison term ranges from 120 days to one year or at least 120 days of community service. Third-time offenders in Arkansas are also subject to a fine ranging from $900 to $5,000. A third-time offender whose BAC was .08 or more faces a 30-month license suspension. If the offender is permitted to drive on an ignition interlock restricted license, the suspension period is a minimum of one year.
  • Offenders in Arkansas who are convicted of DWI for a fourth time within five years of the previous convictions are subject to a prison term ranging from one to six years or at least one year of community service. If, however, a passenger under 16 was in the vehicle at the time of the offense, the prison term ranges from two to six years or at least two years of community services. These offenders are also subject to an Arkansas fine ranging from $900 to $5,000. Driving privileges are revoked for four years.
  • Offenders who are convicted of DWI in Arkansas for a fifth or subsequent time within five years of the previous convictions are subject to a prison term ranging from two to 10 years or at least two years of community service. If, however, a passenger under 16 was in the vehicle at the time of the offense, the prison term ranges from three to 10 years or at least three years of community service. These offenders are also subject to a fine ranging from $900 to $5,000. Driving privileges are revoked for four years.
  • Every person whose license is suspended or revoked as a result of a DWI conviction in Arkansas is required to complete an Arkansas alcohol education program or alcoholism treatment program.

Ignition Interlock

Any offender in Arkansas who is permitted to drive on an ignition interlock restricted license may be required to drive with that restriction for one year after expiration of their license suspension period.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties associated with the Arkansas DWI laws, a person who holds an Arkansas commercial driver's license and is convicted of DWI for the first time will lose his or her commercial driver's license for one year, regardless of whether the offense was committed while driving a commercial or noncommercial vehicle in Arkansas. If the DWI was committed while the commercial driver was transporting hazardous materials, the driver will lose his commercial driver's license three years. If a person who holds a commercial driver's license commits a second DWI offense in Arkansas, that person will lose his commercial driver's license for life.

Drivers Under 21

The Arkansas underage DUI law applies to drivers under 21. If, however, there is evidence that a minor has a blood alcohol concentration of more than .04 but less than .08, the minor may be prosecuted under the Arkansas DWI statute that applies to persons 21 and over. If the minor is prosecuted under the Arkansas underage DUI statutes, the penalties are as follows:

  • First-time offenders in Arkansas will be fined between $100 and $500. They must perform public service work as ordered by a judge. The driver's license suspension period is 90 days.
  • Second-time offenders in Arkansas will be fined between $200 and $1,000. They must perform community service work for at least 30 days. The driver's license suspension period is one year.
  • A minor who commits a third or subsequent offense in Arkansas will be fined between $500 and $2,000. The offender must also perform community service work for at least 60 days. The minor's Arkansas driver's license will be revoked until his or her 21st birthday or for three years, whichever period is longer.
  • All underage drivers whose licenses are suspended as a result of an underage DUI must complete an Arkansas alcohol and driving education program for underage drivers, an alcoholism treatment program, or both.

What is the Arkansas "Civil Liability for Sale of Alcohol to a Minor" Statute?

Under this statute, an alcoholic beverage retailer in Arkansas who knowingly sells alcohol to a minor when the retailer should have reasonably known that the purchaser was a minor is subject to civil liability if the sale caused injury to the minor or if the sale caused the minor to injure a third person.

What is the Arkansas "Civil Liability for Sale of Alcohol to a Clearly Intoxicated Person" Statute?

Under this statute, an alcoholic beverage retailer in Arkansas who knowingly sells alcohol to a "clearly intoxicated" person when the retailer should have reasonably known that the person was "clearly intoxicated" at the time of the sale is subject to civil liability if the sale caused an injury to another person. Under this law, a person in Arkansas is considered "clearly intoxicated" when the person is so obviously intoxicated at the time of the sale that he presents a clear danger to others. A retailer can defend the action by presenting evidence that he had a reasonable belief that the person was not clearly intoxicated or that the person would not be operating a motor vehicle while in the impaired state.

Criminal Penalties in Arkansas for Furnishing or Selling Alcohol to a Minor

In Arkansas, it is a crime for anyone to knowingly furnish alcohol to a minor. First-time offenders face a term of imprisonment of up to 30 days and a $100 fine. A second conviction within three years carries a prison term of up to six years and a fine of up to $10,000.

This statute also makes it a crime for anyone in Arkansas to knowingly sell alcohol to a minor. A first conviction carries a prison term of up to six years and a fine of up to $10,000. A second conviction within five years carries a prison term of three to 10 years and a fine of up to $10,000.

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  • The main difference between alcoholism (pathological alcohol dependence) and willful alcohol abuse is whether a person can stop drinking at will; if they cannot, then there is "impaired control" over their alcohol use, which is the primary indicator of an alcohol addiction.
  • Alcohol abuse can erode the stomach lining and cause chronic blood seepage into the stomach. In extreme cases, a vessel can rupture and cause major bleeding.
  • According to the Task Force of the National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, a variety of prevention strategies have been implemented by colleges across the U.S. in an effort to reduce high-risk drinking and its consequences on college campuses, including programs that target freshmen, athletes, sorority and fraternity members, and students that violate college alcohol policies.
  • Binge drinking, which can potentially be deadly, is most often described as consuming five or more drinks at one sitting.